Collection: 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzles

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1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzles

A 1000-piece jigsaw is ideal for those who regularly do jigsaws, for those who are finding 500-piece jigsaw puzzles a little too easy, or newbies who love a challenge.

Doing more complex jigsaws is a perfect pastime, as it is an excellent way to challenge your brain. It helps you unwind, does not require much room or equipment, and offers hours of entertainment at a low price.

Many people enjoy taking on puzzles with 500 pieces or less without having a technique and jumping right in, connecting the pieces as they go. However, using this method with a 1000-piece puzzle will likely quickly lead to frustration. One thing is a good challenge, but expecting to finish a 1000-piece jigsaw in this way without ending up calling it a day before you finish is highly unlikely.

One-thousand-piece jigsaw puzzles have too many parts to be mastered by piece-by-piece selection. Rather than undertaking the puzzle as a whole, breaking it into smaller manageable tasks helps hold your interest and encourages steady progress.

Choosing 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzles

A 1000-piece jigsaw can be intimidating the first time you attempt a puzzle of this size. You need to consider the design carefully before buying because if it has an image that contains a lot of the same colour, such as a white background, a seascape, or expansive green fields, you could find it more frustrating than fun. You might also want to avoid very dark puzzle designs, particularly those with lots of black. These can be tough to complete.

Times have advanced beyond recognition since the days when jigsaws featured boats, trains, fairy tale characters, or pets. Nowadays, you can find jigsaws depicting any scene imaginable, with some high niche topics available such as adrenaline sports, African art, and the trippy 1960s. Anything you can photograph, paint or draw can be found on a jigsaw puzzle if you look hard enough.

There are jelly beans and plates of baked beans for hard-wired sadists. Despite all of this, old favourites remain popular, steam train puzzles and country cottage scenery still sell well.

If you are new to 1000-piece jigsaws, look for a good contrast of colours and shapes when choosing a puzzle.

Sticking to a regular rectangular-shaped puzzle is a good idea if you are a giant-size puzzle newbie. Shaped or circular puzzles are usually harder to assemble.

Pick a puzzle that matches your experience. It might be tempting to go for a 5000-piece jigsaw when previously you have only managed a 500-piece puzzle, and it's OK to enjoy a challenge. But it is better to build up your skills before moving on to expert-level puzzles when it comes to jigsaws. When solving a puzzle, the journey is as much fun as reaching the destination and working on a jigsaw that matches your skill level is far more enjoyable than attempting something too complex that you'll quit halfway through.

If you are doing the puzzle with others, pick a design that everyone participating will enjoy to keep motivated.

How to Complete a 1000-Piece Jigsaw

Laid out here is a step-by-step guide to finishing a 1,000-piece jigsaw that will also work for puzzles with more than 1000 pieces.

Before starting a 1000-piece puzzle, you will need to choose a workspace. If you start such a giant puzzle on a space with another function (like a dining table), it may not be convenient to move it once it is partly assembled, so make sure your chosen space will not interfere with daily life.

If you live in a small space, one solution is to buy a roll-up puzzle mat. These are usually made of felt, and when you are done with puzzling for the day, you roll up your work and place it in the tube provided with the mat. You can then store it basically anywhere until you are ready to continue with the puzzle.

Plastic bags or Tupperware containers are sufficient for storing sorted pieces to keep them organised and avoid any small pieces going astray along the way.

Make sure your workspace or puzzle mat will accommodate the completed puzzle and the unplaced pieces you need to study. One-thousand-piece jigsaw puzzles for adults are usually around 20 inches x 27 inches, or 50 cm by 70 cm, so you'll need a workspace that can hold the puzzle plus a few extra inches for the spare pieces.

Starting Out

Before starting to look for pieces, turn all the pieces upwards. Placing them all the right way up can be tedious, but it will make the puzzle-solving process much more straightforward in the long run.

Once you have all the pieces upwards, find all the edge pieces to create the border. Constructing the frame gives you a set space to work within as you develop the puzzle. This approach only works well with standard jigsaw puzzles that have four straight edges.

When you have the border set up (no small feat with a 1000-piece jigsaw), it is time to move on to classifying the rest of the pieces. The easiest way to do this is by sorting them into piles depending on the colour. This allows you to start to build recognisable clusters of the puzzle.

Some puzzles have designs that are highly challenging because they have repeating objects and colours. If you have chosen one of these, you'll need to try to separate colours that appear less often and concentrate on the pieces' shape.

Pieces without a predominant colour should go in a separate pile that you check when you've depleted your main colour piles.

Identifying pieces

Some pieces are identifying parts of the puzzle because they have a distinguishing feature such as text or a colour that only appears once in the design. Keep those separate to use as you can. Some puzzles also have pieces with an odd, unusual shape; you can also keep these apart as they are simple to spot where they go as you start assembling the puzzle.

If you want to sort further, you can organise your pieces by colour and shape. Jigsaw puzzle pieces are shapes with "tabs" and "holes." Sometimes it's obvious which pieces will not fit together just by looking at them. And other times, it will look like a piece will fit, but it doesn't. As you get familiar with these shapes, you'll be able to visualize the negative space and recognize more quickly what will fit together and what won't.

If you were doing a puzzle with a blue sky, for instance, you'd separate all the blue pieces into piles of "2 holes" or "2 knobs." You'd then go searching for matching parts by visualizing the negative space.

Instead of working on the entire puzzle at once, it is helpful to work on small portions so that you're finishing sections. This will help keep you interested, and you'll have an optical report of your progress.

Put the finished sections approximately where they are in the puzzle, even if they are not joined to the edges. Visualizing the space around the sections will make it easier for you to find the pieces surrounding them, and you'll soon have the sections connected to the edge.

If you feel bored or tired or bored, put the puzzle away for the day. Like anything, trying to do much at once can take the fun out of a project. Looking at it later or the next day with fresh eyes will make all the difference to your enjoyment and progress. 

Once you're finished the puzzle, congratulate yourself! You could even treat yourself to a prize of another jigsaw design!

Art & Fable 1000 Piece Puzzles

At the Art & Fable Puzzle company, we believe in supporting living, working artists.

Our goal is to bring attention to the work of dedicated artists. Their artwork consists of exquisite designs of forgotten fables. Our plan to accomplish the goal of showcasing their work is to create premium quality jigsaws. A percentage of every sale goes to charity.

From our unparalleled selection of licenced art jigsaws, you can choose from artistic, deeply moving designs to those that are candid and fun!

The Art & Fable company hopes you will love these paintings and storybook illustrations converted into top-quality puzzles. The art combined with our characteristic velvet-Touch jigsaw's surface is the base of our goal: to help artists and good causes while providing buyers with a superb puzzle experience.

Jigsaw Puzzle Fun Facts

The fastest time to put together a previously unknown 1000-piece jigsaw puzzle is 1:01:29 minutes at the US National Jigsaw Puzzle Championships of 1986 in Ohio, USA. A two-person team holds this record. Jigsaw cutter Dave Evans, from Weymouth, Dorset, holds the world record for the fastest cutting time. Dave cut a 1000-piece wooden jigsaw in 2 hours, 26 minutes, and 45 seconds. A little-known fact is, on average, it takes four times as long to complete a 1,000-piece jigsaw as it does to finish a 500-piece puzzle. Each time you double the number of puzzle pieces, you quadruple the difficulty level. So, a 2,000-piece jigsaw would take sixteen times longer to finish than a 500-piece puzzle. The jigsaw with the most pieces is thought to be one made in 2011 at a university in Vietnam. It has a staggering 551,232 pieces. For a 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle, it will take you about 30 minutes to get all the pieces placed the right way up, with the edge pieces separated into a separate pile. You can double this time to sort all the pieces into rough groups of colours. The word 'Jigsaw' is so established in the English language that more than 140 British registered companies use it in their trading name. In the late 19th century, the average price of a wooden jigsaw puzzle was higher than £1.00. This was more than most of the UK working population earned in a week. It is said that Queen Victoria used to like doing jigsaws. Nowadays, puzzles are one of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth's favourite hobbies. She does not want to see the picture of the completed jigsaws on the box before she starts a puzzle, as she believes this makes it too easy.